Resources in the ALEA Library consist of Agile case studies and white papers created by ALEA.

TitleDescription
Agile Surveillance PointsHow to better engage customers and users in project activities
Story Point EstimatingSimplifying product backlog estimating
Managing Projects of Chaotic and Unpredictable BehaviorAn effective, time-tested method for managing chaotic projects
Scrum is Simple!A step-by-step approach for implementing Scrum
Sprint Planning MeetingHow to conduct Scrum sprint planning
Demystifying Agile MythsAgile myths debunked
Retrospectives are HealthyTips for conducting successful retrospectives
The Daily ScrumAn eye-opening approach to the Daily Scrum meetings
The Sprint ReviewGreat points on preparing for and conducting Sprint Reviews
The Product OwnerThe value of the Product Owner and their daily challenges
The Scrum TaskboardThis paper addresses what is known as the most effective information radiator used to communicate daily progress by Scrum teams.
Requirements Definition Sprints: An Agile Case StudyThis case study addresses a situation that happens on projects more frequently than not when project planning is inadequate.
Managing Impediments: An Agile Case StudyThis case study addresses impediments that inundated a large program and the changes that were implemented to manage them.
Agile Software Development MethodsA set of descriptions of the most noted Agile Software Development methods currently in use by teams around the world.
Applying Scrum to Stabilize Systems Engineering ExecutionThis article focuses on the application of Scrum; its simplicity, values, principles and practices to stabilize system engineering activities
An Untested SCM Technology SolutionA solution that was implemented to improve an expensive software build problem.
Back to CM Basics: Change ControlWhy change control is vital to managing work products
Potential Use of Agile Methods in Selected DoD Acquisitions: Requirements Development and ManagementThis Technical Note is one of several SEI Technical Notes that Carnegie Mellon's Software Engineering Institute has produced that investigate Agile adoption issues in the DoD and other regulated settings.
Agile Software Teams: How They Engage with Systems Engineering on DoD Acquisition ProgramsThis Software Engineering Institute (SEI) report addresses some of the key issues that occur when Agile software teams engage with systems engineering functions in the development and acquisition of software-reliant systems.
Agile Methods in Air Force Sustainment: Status and OutlookThis Software Engineering Institute (SEI) paper examines using Agile techniques in the software sustainment arena—specifically on Air Force programs. The intended audience is the staff of DoD programs and related personnel who intend to use Agile methods during software sustainment. Some of the findings may be useful to those working in other highly regulated environments.
9th Annual State of Agile SurveyThis report represents a compilation of quantifiable data that was gathered from participating organizations during a survey that was conducted in 2014. 94% of all organizations that took the survey claim to use Agile. 35%of the respondents were from organizations of more than 5,000 people, and 20% worked in very large organization with more than 20,000 people.
From the Trenches: Improving the Daily Stand-up MeetingThis report contains an analysis of the comments from a wide ranging audience who responded to a message posted on LinkedIn by Dick Carlson. Many of the comments expressed some strong or very strong opinions about Sprint 0, both pro and con.
The Scrum Daily Standup Meeting: Your Questions AnsweredThe daily standup, or daily scrum, is a short meeting the team uses to briefly communicate work commitments with each other. Dick Carlson answers some questions that agile teams, management, stakeholders, and those who are thinking about transitioning to agile commonly have about these daily standup meetings.
Opinions About Agile: An analysis of a LinkedIn post on Sprint 0There's nothing new about project preparation. It doesn’t matter how it's conducted, as long as the organization and the project team takes some actions to ensure the majority of key obstacles are removed or mitigated.
Which Agile Method is Best?Sometimes people ask, “Which Agile method is the best?” People have a tendency to want the “best” of something. It is a valid question, and it has a clear and emphatic answer: “It all depends.”